Wednesday, 25 January 2017

Here come gadgets for BookLikes bloggers!

Reblogged from: BookLikes

The bookish gadgets make us really happy. Not regular happy, we mean crazy joyful. Our heart rate increases, the blood pressure rises, the cheeks blush, both of our hand shake and lip corners lift up into a smile. A very big smile. Our reaction was the same when we teamed up with Mikołaj Adamczyk, the 3D designer and artist from Clonova, who decided to expand his portfolio with the collection of bookish gadgets. Yep, you heard us right, THE BOOKISH GADGETS! So, who's interested? :D

 

What's 3D printing anyway?

3D printing uses a printer to create three-dimensional objects in comparison to a regular printer where are only two dimensions: the front of the page and the back. 3D printing adds a volume to these two.

3D printed object are created by adding or depositing layers of material. Plastic is the most commonly used but you can print with number of materials including steel, silver or gold, basically anything that can be melted or put back together in layers. The technology is developing super fast and it's already possible to print buildings or eatable books. How cool is that!

 

But let's get back to the bookish stuff :) Our brainstorms resulted in the three projects listed below but worry not, more are coming! As always, we're curious of your opinion. How do you like them? Do you consider them useful? Would you like to ... get one of these? :) It's the very beginning of the 3D projects so we'd like to ask: if you had an opportunity to print yourself a 3D bookish gadget what would it be?

 

Please let us know in the comment section below.  We do plan on some surprises so stay tuned :-)

 

1. Cat a Stopper is a handy hand-free way to keep your books open. This book page holder and a bookmark is great to hold a book or a magazine wide open for easier viewing, it's also perfect for reading while standing or lying. A helpful gadget for all multitask readers who read many books at once (academic research) or prefers big format and hard cover books. Helps you keep your place while studying, enjoying a cup of coffee or taking an Instagram shot. Awesome for cookbooks, it will keep your books clean and spotless.

2. A transparent scrap page / note taking bookmark

This will help you stay organized and keep your books in a perfect condition, no more dog ears! Thanks to this note taking page you can highlight the passage you find essential and add all necessary notes. Perfect for students, analytic readers, quote lovers.

3. DIY Bookshelf

There are never too many books, only not enough bookshelves in the book lover's life. Here's a ready to go plan to create a shelf of your own design.

Can't wait to hear what you think of those! Add your comments and ideas for more bookish gadgets in the comment section below.

Original post: miduhadi.booklikes.com/post/1520478/here-come-gadgets-for-booklikes-bloggers

Roseanne Montillo’s, The Lady & Her Monsters, Takes us Behind the Scenes & Plops us Down Right into Mary Shelley’s Life


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Oh, what a sad life Mary Shelley led!
The book follows Mary’s life right from the moment of her birth and touches on every source of inspiration that led to the writing of Frankenstein.
The story would leave Mary for a while at some points and follow other people who were vital to the writing of the book. These deviations made for refreshing changes.


Mary came from the union of two geniuses
. She gulped down revolutionary ideas, novel theories, and latest scientific developments with her mother’s milk. She grew up sneaking into the soirees thrown by her father every week. Scientists, artists, and all kinds of important people attended those events.

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Those ideas took hold in her and came out in the form of Frankenstein’s story.

The pall that we find hanging in the going-ons within the novel is not much different from what Mary had to live with, all her life. She had inherited depression from her mother while her father did his best to make things worse every time she reached out to him for emotional support. Losing three children did not help much and marrying someone who was also going through a lot of guilt for driving their wife to suicide kind of sealed her fate.

Lord Byron

Polidori

Percy Shelley

The people and her so-called friends and relatives weren’t too kind to her either and her husband’s death did the rest of the damage. She died at the age of 53 and the only source of happiness in her life was her happily married son and his wife.
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Mary's Grave


Interwoven with Mary’s tale is the tale of grave robbers and resurrectionists who can be found operating in many parts of the world even today! Their profession — stealing bodies — helped medical science but horrified me. Here’s an example, where the body they stole ended up in the hands of Aldini who believed he could shock the cadaver back to life:

“On the first application of the arcs the jaw began to quiver, the adjoining muscles were horribly contorted, and the left eye actually opened.” For those who had not witnessed such things before, Foster actually appeared to have returned to life and was now staring up at them.

The Anatomy Act was introduced as a result of these macabre forays and just made me realize how new laws have to be forged with the arrival of novel situations. Nobody thought they’d need laws for the internet before it became mainstream and yet here we are. It reminds me of something else from the book: even during Mary’s life, others could use her work and adapt it for the theaters etc. There were no copyright laws back then to keep people from doing that!

It is said that while the son inherited his father’s good looks, he didn’t inherit any talent. Personally, I think he was the luckiest of them all.


Some words that stayed with me


All three, it was suspected, formed a crush on Shelley, but only Mary had the mental capabilities and legacy he was attracted to.

Those who came to learn of Shelley’s subsequent romantic adventures knew very well why his wife had been disposed of and that particular mistress gained. Even Harriet knew why she had been set aside. When asked this by Thomas Love Peacock, she replied, “Nothing, but that her name was Mary, and not only Mary, but Mary Wollstonecraft.” Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, at that.

 

Some interesting bits


He continued to investigate the drug’s properties and was so astounded with the results, he derived the name laudanum from the Latin word laudare,to praise.”

One such town was Nieder-Beerbach, on whose summit, barely visible from the water’s edge, stood the famed, or infamous, Burg Frankenstein.
“What’s in a name?” Mary Shelley wrote years later in a book titled Rambles in Germany and Italy.

the castle was the site of much bloodshed when a member of the family was locked in mortal combat with an enemy of unusual fortitude and cunning, with a deep understanding of psychological warfare. The enemy, intent on overtaking Burg Frankenstein, had successfully overthrown other families in the past. Known for his brutality, Vlad the Impaler and his doings provided, in part, inspiration for another gothic masterpiece: Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

most notorious inhabitant, Johann Konrad Dippel, a man who, strangely enough, bore a striking similarity to Victor Frankenstein, and to an extent, to Percy Shelley as well.

 

Words that I learned


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More details on Project Frankenstein

Friday, 20 January 2017

An Account of What Happened on My Two Recent Frankendates and an Update on the status of Project Frankenstein


 

Frankendate #1


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This Frankenmonster hailed from Switzerland, just as Mary Shelley had said he would. He was shy and reticent about the horrors he had seen.
Part of the series, The Department 19, by Will Hill, this novella is a “file” from the department. It fills in some gaps from the time Frankenmonster left to die and then didn’t, ending up in North America, instead!
I liked that the novella was fast paced without rushing the reader and how it told us more about a character that most readers of the series have already met and liked.


Frankendate #2

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This Frankenmonster did not play a huge part in the story and was German! What’s more, he was betrayed by the “protagonist”, just as the original one had been.
This one, too, was part of a series, Pax Britannia by Jonathan Green, but I hadn’t read any of the other books.
When it comes to what I thought about the book, oh boy, where do I even begin!
  1. Riddled with cliches
  2. Female characters scantily dressed, supposed to be spies but so incompetent that only the hero could rally them into a functional team
  3. Non-stop action makes you think you’re watching a movie rather than reading a book
  4. Predictable storyline
  5. Severe need of editing/proofreading
and so on…I mean, imagine what it would take to make a book with monsters, time travel, and steampunk elements fail this miserably for me!

One thing useful that I did come across because of this book:
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The Vitruvian Frankenmonster aka My Current Wallpaper

Status of Project Frankenstein

  1. Parent Material: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  2. Others’ Take: The Mammoth Book of Frankenstein by Stephen Jones
  3. Historical Retakes: Anno Frankenstein by Jonathan Green
  4. Genre Spins: Steampunk: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein by Zdenko Basic
  5. Young Adult Forays: Dr. Frankenstein’s Daughters by Suzanne Weyn
  6. Sci-Fi Pastiche: Prodigal Son by Dean Koontz
  7. Philosophical Entree: Frankenstein and Philosophy by Nicholas Michaud
  8. Series Picker-Uppers: The Second Birth of Frankenstein by Will Hill
  9. Prequels: This Dark Endeavor by Kenneth Oppel
  10. Precipitating Conditions: The Lady and Her Monsters by Roseanne Montillo
  11. Character Spotlight: My Frankenstein by Michael J. Lee
  12. Technological Difficulties: Frankenstein’s Cat by Emily Anthes
  13. Changed Perspectives: Frankenstein’s Monster by Susan Heyboer O’Keefe
  14. Graphic Detail: Monster Of Frankenstein by Dick Briefer, David Jacobs, Alicia Jo Rabins Edwards
After being really disappointed by #7 on the list, which I am struggling to finish, I chanced upon #10. Let me tell you, it is amazing and I suspect that I will be done with it on no time!

Sunday, 15 January 2017

First Book Loot of 2017!





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New Arrivals at appear Midu Reads as the new year starts. I have 3 nonfiction books in the pile & am really excited about those! You can also see Assail by Ian C. Esselmont, a Joe Abercombie, Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, and  Monster Island by David Wellington--all of which are going to be awesome. There's also Dragon Horse by Peter Ward, which I bought because a) shiny, b) hardcover, c)it had the words, epic, fantasy, & China written on it!

Book Synopses

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1. Dragon Horse by Peter Ward

"Set in ancient China, two brothers fight the classic battle between good and evil as the Shadow-without-name attempts to break free from eternal imprisonment by utilizing the strength and power of the famed dragon horses. Rokshan and An-Lushan are drawn into this centuries-old struggle, along with a young girl destined to become the Spellweaver of her nomadic tribe.
As An-Lushan is pulled towards the dark, Rokshan must embark upon a dangerous journey and learn the innermost secrets of the dragons."

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2. Assail by Ian C. Esselmont

"Tens of thousands of years of ice is melting, and the land of Assail, long a byword for menace and inaccessibility, is at last yielding its secrets. Tales of gold discovered in the region's north circulate in every waterfront dive and sailor's tavern, and now countless adventurers and fortune-seekers have set sail in search of riches. All these adventurers have to guide them are legends and garbled tales of the dangers that lie in wait -- hostile coasts, fields of ice, impassable barriers and strange, terrifying creatures. But all accounts concur that the people of the north meet all trespassers with the sword. And beyond are rumoured to lurk Elder monsters out of history's very beginnings." Read more.

 

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3. Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson

"Cryptonomicon zooms all over the world, careening conspiratorially back and forth between two time periods--World War II and the present. Our 1940s heroes are the brilliant mathematician Lawrence Waterhouse, crypt analyst extraordinaire, and gung-ho, morphine-addicted marine Bobby Shaftoe. They're part of Detachment 2702, an Allied group trying to break Axis communication codes while simultaneously preventing the enemy from figuring out that their codes have been broken. Their job boils down to layer upon layer of deception. Dr. Alan Turing is also a member of 2702, and he explains the unit's strange workings to Waterhouse. "When we want to sink a convoy, we send out an observation plane first... Of course, to observe is not its real duty--we already know exactly where the convoy is. Its real duty is to be observed... Then, when we come round and sink them, the Germans will not find it suspicious." Read more.


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4. The Fruit Hunters: A Story of Nature, Obsession, Commerce, and Adventure by Adam Leith Gollner

"Tasty, lethal, hallucinogenic, and medicinal – fruits have led nations into wars, fueled dictatorships, and even lured us into new worlds. Adam Leith Gollner weaves business, science, and travel into a riveting narrative about one of earth’s most desired foods." Read more.

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5. A Buzz in the Meadow: The Natural History of a French Farm by Dave Goulson

"In A Buzz in the Meadow, Goulson returns to tell the tale of how he bought a derelict farm in the heart of rural France. Over the course of a decade, on thirty-three acres of meadow, he created a place for his beloved bumblebees to thrive. But other creatures live there too, myriad insects of every kind, many of which Goulson had studied before in his career as a biologist. You'll learn how a deathwatch beetle finds its mate, why butterflies have spots on their wings, and see how a real scientist actually conducts his experiments." Read more.
 

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6. Half a King by Joe Abercrombie

Betrayed by his family and left for dead, Prince Yarvi, reluctant heir to a divided kingdom, has vowed to reclaim a throne he never wanted.
But first he must survive cruelty, chains and the bitter waters of the Shattered Sea itself - all with only one good hand. Born a weakling in the eyes of a hard, cold world, he cannot grip a shield or swing an axe, so he has sharpened his mind to a deadly edge.
Gathering a strange fellowship of the outcast, he finds they can help him more than any noble could. Even so, Yarvi's path may end as it began - in twists, traps and tragedy...


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7. An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield

In An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth, Col. Hadfield takes readers deep into his years of training and space exploration to show how to make the impossible possible. Through eye-opening, entertaining stories filled with the adrenaline of launch, the mesmerizing wonder of spacewalks, and the measured, calm responses mandated by crises, he explains how conventional wisdom can get in the way of achievement-and happiness. His own extraordinary education in space has taught him some counterintuitive lessons: don't visualize success, do care what others think, and always sweat the small stuff. Read more.



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8. Monster Island by David Wellington

It's one month after a global disaster. The most "developed" nations of the world have fallen to the shambling zombie masses. Only a few pockets of humanity survive — in places rife with high-powered weaponry, such as Somalia. In New York City, the dead walk the streets, driven by an insatiable hunger for all things living. One amongst them is different; though he shares their appetites he has retained his human intelligence. Alone among the mindless zombies, Gary Fleck is an eyewitness to the end of the world — and perhaps the evil genius behind it all. From the other side of the planet, a small but heavily-armed group of schoolgirls-turned-soldiers has come in search of desperately needed medicine. Dekalb, a former United Nations weapons inspector, leads them as their local guide. Ayaan, a crack shot at the age of sixteen, will stop at nothing to complete her mission. They think they are prepared for anything. On Monster Island they will find that there is something worse even than being undead, as Gary learns the true price of survival.

Thursday, 12 January 2017

Guest-Blogger Icky Loves the Heck Outta the First Book in the Thursday Next Series by Jasper Fforde



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As Icky will tell you later, I browbeat and bullied her into reading this book because I knew how perfect it'd be for her. And what do you know? I was right! Without further ado...


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Background

Quite similar to the phenomenon of writer’s block, there is a thing called reader’s block. The symptoms include not being able to read anything despite a burning desire to do so. Anyway, that was what I was suffering from when like a great friend Midu—my office buddy, an awesome writer, and one of the few cool persons I have in my life right now, suggested (made me read it by force) me a book— The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde. Since I had no choice, I started reading it.

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What I Found

First thing first, I love classics and guess who else share my passion for them? Thursday Next—the protagonist. What started on the basis of mutual interest proved to be an endless romance. There is every kind of awesomeness hidden or sometimes oozing out of the book. Set in an alternative reality, MS. Next’s world has Literatecs who investigate the literary crimes. Surprisingly, there are a huge number of those committed there as well—finally, the criminals have realized what is truly valuable, even if only in the fictional world, but since fiction is where we dwell, it is all good!

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The Protagonist

Thursday Next had been previously involved in Crimea—some kind of world war involving England and Russia. However, she left that behind after her brother dies and she drifts apart from the love of her life over a misunderstanding (you have to read the book to find more about it). Now, she is a litertec and things turn quite interesting when a villain from her past decides to visit her present and meddle with something she prizes the most—books!

Since we are on the topic of past and present—her dad is into timey wimey wibbly wobbly stuff—that explains the daughter’s name. He is quite an intriguing character, who keeps visiting her in his own good time, kind of off his hook but brainy as hell—very Ravenclawish!

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The Villain

Now Mr. Evil has very clear ideas—loves evil just for the sake of it (money is not bad either). The guy could have done great in his life, had he not favored the dark side so much. However, he still considers himself quite successful. He knows how to do anything, like ANYTHING—can walk through solid materials without being noticed. Interesting, right? He keeps crossing Thursday’s path every now and then.

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Other Amazing Stuff

Apart from the good versus evil, there are several interesting theories. The best one being—Let’s get inside a book—LITERALLY! This is what actually grabbed my attention, in the world of Thursday Next, you can move inside a book. I find the idea beautiful¬—it is like when you are really into a book, it allows you to enter it, but this time you can make changes as well!!! You meet the characters and alter the story. Amazing, no? I would love to dive and save Severus Snape any day. Will keep him for me, even if it means a life full of potion making—the things we do for love!

Sorry for that moment of self-indulgence!

Coming back to Thursday’s world, she has a genius scientist uncle who invents all kind of amazing stuff and it is his machine that allows you to travel inside a book. Wait, things are going to turn even more exciting—bookworms—actual creatures that feed off prepositions, fuel the machine. I mean how more cool it can get.

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My Verdict

There are several other interesting theories to explore in there. I will be leaving those for you to discover on your own. For me, it had all the things I needed but then again, my book agent (read drug dealer) knows me so well. If you are looking for a book suggestion that will just make your day—be friends with Midu and she will provide you with just the right stuff.

Happy reading!

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Saturday, 7 January 2017

Weirding It Out with Weird Enough: Dune Re-Read Update #1


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I started re-reading Dune with a friend of mine, who is reading it for the first time. Thinking that I would compare what I thought of it before with how I feel about the book now was no good. I have completely forgotten the story! In a way, that is a good thing since I am unable to re-read books, if I remember the story too well.

One thought hit me as I started reading Dune -- there is a confidence and certainty in the way Herbert writes. It lends the story and the universe that it is set in more credibility. As I read, I didn't doubt whether such a place could exist. I knew it did!

Since we divided the book into several parts, this is an update about the parts that we have covered until now. The easiest way to point out which parts we read is through the "excerpts" that are given at the beginning of every chapter -- if we can call them chapters.

As devices, these quotes are so clever! The reader knows the exact frame of the events that take place and yet do not have to sit through info dumps.

We started with:

A beginning is the time for taking the most delicate care that the balances are correct. This every sister of the Bene Gesserit knows. To begin your study of the life of Muad’Dib, then, take care that you first place him in his time: born in the 57th year of the Padishah Emperor, Shaddam IV. And take the most special care that you locate Muad’Dib in his place: the planet Arrakis. Do not be deceived by the fact that he was born on Caladan and lived his first fifteen years there. Arrakis, the planet known as Dune, is forever his place.
–from “Manual of Muad’Dib” by the Princess Irulan

and read till here:

Over the exit of the Arrakeen landing field, crudely carved as though with a poor instrument, there was an inscription that Muad’Dib was to repeat many times. He saw it that first night on Arrakis, having been brought to the ducal command post to participate in his father’s first full stage conference. The words of the inscription were a plea to those leaving Arrakis, but they fell with dark import on the eyes of a boy who had just escaped a close brush with death. They said: “O you who know what we suffer here, do not forget us in your prayers.”
—from “Manual of Muad’Dib” by the Princess Irulan

A summary of what has happened until now:

  1. Paul is tested by the Reverend Mother, the leader of the Bene Gesserits.
  2. We meet the Atreides and their enemies, Harkonnens. 10, 000s of years ago, Harkonnens were stripped of their titles for showing cowardice in a war. That is just one of the reasons they hate the Atreides who took over and won the war.
  3. Atreides are being sent to the brutal desert planet, Arrakis, where the precious spice is mined.
  4. That the Emperor wants to see the house fall and Duke Leto has plans of his own to counter that.
  5. The Harkonnens have plotted the downfall of Atreides and they will be betrayed by Paul's doctor, Yueh.
  6. The blame is to fall on Lady Jessica (Paul's mother) who is a Bene Gesserit (BG).
  7. The BGs perform myth-seeding to keep their operatives safe and they have created a legend about Paul in Arrakis.

 

My Thoughts

Here I found yet another book where the author jumps from POV to POV within a single scene! Herbert does this in a way that does not feel unnatural plus there's the advantage of knowing what motivates multiple characters to behave in a certain way.

It is amazing that the author has the villains well defined right from the start. There is no dithering about who the bad guys are and yet it does not make the reading any less fun.

I found out that there was a re-read going on at Tor and in this second installment, the origins of the names and the various terms used in the book are discussed. You can read the whole thing over there, so I won't be repeating it.

Reading the comments for the third installment on Tor led me to a comment where someone compared the Aes Sedai from the WoT series to the BGs in Dune. I think the fact that the BGs are constantly trying to make people think they are less smarter than they actually are makes them the exact opposite of the Aes Sedai!

The 4th installment brought this, which made me laugh:

The Harry Potter connection invites a mashup… with a villain referred to as “he who cannot be weighed”…

Some fun remarks about how Brian has ruined the Dune universe also made it into the comments, along with this comic:

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If you are having trouble pronouncing any of the Arabic -- and other -- terms in the book, this guide can help. It includes sound bites in Herbert's voice!

Weird Enough’s Musings

So, my book dealer and my office partner-in-crime, Midu, announced that we were going to do a buddy read. She wanted to re-read Dune, while I would be reading it for the first time. This is also my very first blog about a book review. It is going to be all over the place. You have been warned.
So let’s begin!

The first part of the book that we divided was from the beginning to just before the “chapter” starting with this quote:

“There is probably no more terrible instant of enlightenment than the one in which you discover your father is a man—with human flesh.”
—from “Collected Sayings of Muad’Dib” by Princess Irulan
Intriguing, no? There are no chapters in the book. Instead, each part starts with a “quote” retelling the tale from a historical aspect about Muad’Dib. The first part that struck me was the Arabic-esque setting and the language which included many words rooted in Arabic. (btw, Muad’Dib, in Arabic, means teacher).

The story starts by dumping you face-down into the mysterious grim setting. There is no forewarning. This, I admit, was a little unsettling at first, but I got used to it. Paul, the prince of the Atreides family, is our 15-year old protagonist. The Atreides family is packing up from their home in Caladan to move to Arrakis, the desert planet which harvests spice, the most valuable commodity. Paul’s mother, we find, is from the Bene Gesserit (at this point, all I could assume was that this is a sisterhood or a tribe with great power, plus they have Sherlock-like observation skills). The “Reverend Mother” is a mysterious old hag who comes over and “tests” Paul with a torture device. Paul passes the test (yaaaay!) and we have the old hag thinking about the possibility of Paul being the “Kwisatz Haderach” (I just assumed this is a prophetic being that the Bene Gesserit has been waiting for).

The next part reveals the people we are supposed to hate—the Harkonnens. And oh, the plotting! Nice! We also get to know about what a Mentat is—a cool-ass mercenary.

Later, the Atreides family reaches the Arrakis, and we learn about Paul’s teachers: Gurney Halleck and Thufir Hawat (a Mentat). Also about Dr. Yueh, who is being forced by the Harkonnens to betray the family. The first night at Arrakis, Paul is attacked. He only survives because he didn’t sleep as he was supposed to, and uses common sense to stay live. Smart kid.

Okay, so I really like Lady Jessica, Paul’s mother. In an interaction with a Freman woman (Arrakis native), I loved how she used the nuances of the conversation to take control of the conversation. Total badass!

The Duke Leto Atreides is a man stuck in the politics of the Houses, facing the evil Harkonnens on his own. He’s tired by all the shit. He’s also a leader who cares about the lives of his people—he actually sacrifices a whole stock of spices to save the workers who got stuck in the desert with the notorious desert worm. He’s going to die soon, poor sod.

So, that’s all for now. Overall, I’m really liking this book. I haven’t read something like this before, so it’s a refreshing read. The author really goes into detail about the politics, the geology and all other details that make this book seem so close to reality!


Tuesday, 3 January 2017

Tolkien Toast, 2017



 

After reading Troy's post, I coaxed The Bear into doing the Tolkien Toast with me! Here we are:



9 Reasons Why 2016 was a Good Year, Monster-Wise!


 

Game Changing Monsters

Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus

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My Review

Why I Loved it

This is the book that launched a thousand books! Written at such a young age, I find it amazing how Mary Shelley changed the world of sci-fi forever. This book featured more than one monster!

The Bonehunters by Steven Erikson

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My Review

Why I Loved it

I loved it for its portrayal of war and military life. I loved how it doesn’t just talk diversity, in terms of gender, race, religion etc but how it is all that! The sixth book in a series that never misses. War was the biggest monster here!

The Chameleon’s Shadow by Minette Walters

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Why I Loved it:

Because Minette Walters doesn’t create characters, she makes them come alive! There isn’t a single book by this author that I haven’t loved. Even though, I was unsure about this one because it was about a soldier returning home from war, which normally doesn’t interest me, it didn’t disappoint! There is no black or white in her stories, just a lot of grey. The real monsters are the ones hiding behind pretty faces!

Not Your Average Monsters

The Dinosaur Lords by Victor Milán

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My Review

Why I Loved It

Dinosaurs as steeds. In Wars. With Knights. How could this book be anything but delicious?!

The Unadulterated Cat by Terry Pratchett

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My Review

Why I Loved It

Pratchett is amazing in small doses. This book was laugh out loud funny and it got everything about the cuddly monsters exactly right!

Daystar by Darcy Town

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Why I Loved It

I had read the previous two books in this series and I needed to know how things would end. I love the humor in Darcy Town’s books and how much of an adventure they are! The monsters in this series are mostly literal ones, including demons and succubi.

The Bicentennial Man and Other Stories by Isaac Asimov

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My Review

Why I Loved It

Again, like Shelley, Asimov changed everything about robot sci-fi! This edition was beautiful, hardcover, and included a small note by the author at the beginning of every story. The monsters in the stories varied from humans to robots and humans, again!

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton

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My Review

Why I Loved It

If you have seen the movies, then you know that monsters come in all sizes and species. The worst are the human ones who never learn from their mistakes!

Mayday: A Kaiju Thriller by Chris Strange

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My Review

Why I Loved It

If Kaijus were not only defeated but kept by the Earthlings and made to fight for entertainment…yeah, it could turn into a disaster of monstrous proportions. This book made a perfect Halloween read!

Like I said, 2016 was an awesome monster of a year and I mostly loved what I read. Hope this year is even better.

Happy Reading!